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 Robert E. Slavin, Alan Cheung, Cynthia Groff, Cynthia Lake, Effective Reading Programs for Middle a Robert E. Slavin, Alan Cheung, Cynthia Groff, Cynthia Lake, Effective Reading Programs for Middle a

Date added: 10/16/2010
Date modified: 10/16/2010
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This article systematically reviews research on the achievement outcomes of four types of approaches to improving the reading of middle and high school students: (1) reading curricula, (2) mixed-method models (methods that combine large-and small-group instruction with computer activities), (3) computer-assisted instruction, and (4) instructional-process programs (methods that focus on providing teachers with extensive professional development to implement specific instructional methods).

 The review concludes that programs designed to change daily teaching practices have substantially greater research support than those focused on curriculum or technology alone. Positive achievement effects were found for instructional-process programs, especially for those involving cooperative learning, and for mixed-method programs. The effective approaches provided extensive professional development and significantly affected teaching practices. In contrast, no studies of reading curricula met the inclusion criteria, and the effects of supplementary computer-assisted instruction were small.

 

Slavin, Robert E., Cheung, Alan, Groff, Cynthia, & Lake, Cynthia. (2008, July/Aug/Sept). Effective reading programs for middle and high schools: A best-evidence synthesis. Reading Research Quarterly, 43(3), 290-322.. Reprinted with permission of the International Reading Association.   (This permission also includes the Responses/letters to the editor.) 

Carol Santa; Mathematica Response Carol Santa; Mathematica Response

Date added: 06/21/2010
Date modified: 06/21/2010
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Comment on the IES study related to CRISS and other programs (first year’s evaluation)

As one of the developers of the programs being evaluated, C. Santa provides us with some critical remarks.

Cynthia Greenleaf, Anthony Petrosino, Response to Slavin, Cheung, Groff, and Lake Cynthia Greenleaf, Anthony Petrosino, Response to Slavin, Cheung, Groff, and Lake

Date added: 10/16/2010
Date modified: 10/16/2010
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Perhaps the one kernel of truth that emerges from the review of these 33 studies is that in almost all cases, doing something to build literacy proficiencies for students in middle and high schools turns out to be better than doing nothing. That is a message our secondary schools need to hear.

 

 

Slavin, Robert E., Cheung, Alan, Groff, Cynthia, & Lake, Cynthia. (2008, July/Aug/Sept). Effective reading programs for middle and high schools: A best-evidence synthesis. Reading Research Quarterly, 43(3), 290-322.. Reprinted with permission of the International Reading Association.   (This permission also includes the Responses/letters to the editor.) 

Effective Reading Programs Effective Reading Programs

Date added: 06/21/2010
Date modified: 06/21/2010
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IES Report (May 2010): Effectiveness IES Report (May 2010): Effectiveness

Date added: 06/21/2010
Date modified: 06/21/2010
Filesize: 2.44 MB
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Institute  of   Education    Sciences

NATIONAL CENTER FOR EDUCATION EVALUATION AND REGIONAL ASSISTANCE

Effectiveness of Selected Supplemental Reading Comprehension Interventions: Findings from Two Student Cohorts

The Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the Department of Education (ED) has undertaken a rigorous evaluation of curricula designed to improve reading comprehension as one step toward meeting that research gap. The study was conducted based on a rigorous experimental design for assessing the effects of four reading comprehension curricula on reading comprehension in selected districts across the country, where schools were randomly assigned to use one of the four treatment curricula in their fifth-grade classrooms or to a control group. The four curricula included in the study are: (1) Project CRISS, developed by CRISS (Santa et al. 2004), (2) ReadAbout, developed by Scholastic (Scholastic 2005), (3) Read for Real, developed by Chapman University and Zaner-Bloser (Crawford et al. 2005), and (4) Reading for Knowledge, developed by the Success for All Foundation (Madden and Crenson 2006).

 

The main findings are:

  • The curricula did not have an impact on students one year after the end of their implementation. In the second year, after the first cohort of students was no longer using the interventions, there were no statistically significant impacts of any of the four curricula.
  • Impacts were not statistically significantly larger after schools had one year of experience using the curricula. Impacts for the second cohort of students were not statistically significantly different from zero or from the impacts for the first cohort of students. (Treatment students in the second cohort attended schools that had one prior year of experience using the study curricula, while treatment students in the first cohort attended schools with no prior experience using the study curricula. Reading for Knowledge was not implemented with the second cohort of students.)
  • The impact of one of the curricula (ReadAbout) was statistically significantly larger after teachers had one year of experience using the curricula. There was a positive, statistically significant impact of ReadAbout on the social studies reading comprehension assessment for second-cohort students taught by teachers who were in the study both years (effect size: 0.22). This impact was statistically significantly larger than the impact for first-cohort students taught by the same teachers in the first year of the study.

In summary, our findings do not support the hypothesis that these four supplemental reading comprehension curricula improve students’ reading comprehension, except when ReadAbout teachers have had one prior year of experience using the ReadAbout curriculum.